St. Barth, French West Indies - Culinary Travel Overview

This exquisite little island’s name evokes the feel of gentle trade winds, the sounds of warm lapping waves mingled with the clink of Champagne flutes and the taste of rum – and maybe a little fois gras.

 

Sophisticated? Yes, St. Barth is considered to be the Caribbean’s culinary capital and is renowned for its world-class dining but on the other side of the coin – in this case the euro – it offers an ambiance of laid back casual, elegance. Locals and visitors alike stop in at the boulangeries for their daily baguette and picnic and swim at the many gorgeous - and public – beaches. All have their choice of elegant, candlit, white table-clothed restaurants serving fine French food and wines, harbor side bistros and delightful feet-in-sand eateries where creole dishes have been served up for generations.

 

This very French island is populated by descendants of early settlers who came from the Normandy and Brittany regions. The Gallic charm is ever-present and traces of the old Norman dialect are heard in the quaint fishing village of Corossol. Fishermen in small boats still ply their trade and the chefs work their magic with the freshly caught local fish. Sun-kissed vegetables come from neighboring Guadalupe.

 

 France offers one of the world’s best cuisines and there is no question it is revered in St. Barth, provision are flown in from the mother-country, fine cheeses, mussels from Brittany for the uber popular moules frites and the wines – and magnums of Champagne.

 

Accommodations include 5 star hotels and intimate beach cottage colonies but it is the villa lifestyle that is celebrated. Many include spectacular kitchens, for cooking in and private chefs are available to prepare and served multi-course dinners paired with wine. Hands-on cooking lessons and culinary experiences can be arranged upon request.

 

Beach loving Francophiles & foodies “inquire within” at hungryforinfo@forks-ontheroad.com

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